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COP26 President Alok Sharma urges offshore wind companies to drive change across the global economy

Sau Ting Kwok - Hong Kong

Sau Ting Kwok - Hong Kong

The President of COP26, the United Nations Climate Change Summit in Glasgow in November, Alok Sharma, has told the offshore wind industry that it has a key role to play in helping to the UK to reach net zero emissions as fast as possible.

Addressing delegates this morning, on the second day of RenewableUK’s Global Offshore Wind conference and exhibition in London in a specially-recorded keynote speech, Mr Sharma said:

“The story of UK offshore wind is a story of success; we’ve grown the largest offshore wind sector in the world, creating entirely new industrial hubs and good green jobs, which is helping us to reach net zero by 2050.  

“The UK is happy to share its experience with international partners and I urge governments to take up these offers and to consider how they’re going to unlock the potential of offshore wind to decarbonise their power supplies. I urge all companies here to support our wider COP26 efforts by driving action across your supply chains, encouraging your suppliers to commit to net zero and working with them to reduce emissions.

In short, use your purchasing power to drive change across the global economy, just as you’re using your inventiveness and acumen to drive the clean energy transition across the world. Together let’s make COP26 the moment when we accelerate the clean energy transition”.

On the first day of the conference, speaking for the first time in his new role as Energy and Climate Change Minister, Greg Hands described offshore wind as “the lynchpin in our efforts to reach net zero”. He told delegates that the Prime Minister has set out an ambitious Ten Point Plan for a Green Industrial Revolution and said “it’s no coincidence that offshore wind took prime position in his vision”.

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